Happy Birthday, Husband

A special Happy Birthday to my husband today.   The one who digs holes for me in the back yard.

And helps me install new windows.

And helps me clean up old bathtubs when he's probably rather be doing ANYTHING else.

Thank you for everything you do... and thank you for going along with all of my crazy ideas.  I love you so much.  Happy Birthday.

PS - I promise we won't do anything that requires work gloves or old pants today.  I will wait until tomorrow.

Can They Even Dye My Eyes to Match My Gown? Uh huh!

Since I've already bored most of you with some serious scrubbing details, lets just say that the scrubbing continued for a few more hours until I was left with this: Which is about as good as it was going to get.  Basically, we got it to the point where there was no more caulk or paint left on the tub and every crevice was smooth to the touch.  We also cleaned it super deep so that when you touched it there was no more dust/dirt/rust/disgusting grime on your hands.  It was exhausting, and I was so excited to move on to the much anticipated next step... priming! I always prime with KILZ for all of my woodworking projects, but this time it was especially important to use since it also has a built in stain-blocker and sealer.  Don't want any gross-ness from Tubby's former life sneaking into its new makeover. To apply, I used a foam roller to get a nice, even coat without brushstrokes.  For the hard to reach areas at the end I used a brush, but I found that the foam roller covered about 98% of the surface. One quick coat of primer later and it was already looking a million times better. The great thing about primer is that it doesn't have to be completely even.  I've found that a solid, thin coat is better than multiple coats or glopping it on to try to force it to be more even.  At this step, it's not about the look, it's about the coverage. Before I get into the painting part, I have to tell you guys the story about the paint, mainly because I'm sure most of you have had this experience in one form or another.  My husband and I were at a big box store to purchase the paint for the outside of the tub.  We found the perfect color based on our very thought out game plan and color palette regarding our future guest bathroom.  I get up to the place where they mix the colors for you, hand him the swatch, and I start talking to Brad about how glossy we want the finish to be.  I believe I said something like, "well, we should probably go with semi-gloss since it's for the outside of the bathtub and it might get wet..." and the paint mixer says "wait, you're using this paint on a bathtub?"  Oh boy. Clearly the kid did not understand that it was a vintage, cast iron claw foot rather than an acrylic tub like they sell in store.  As I continued to try to explain to him the game plan, he brought over another associate who confirmed to me that it definitely would not work and that I needed a special kind of paint that had to be special ordered and bla bla bla.  I assured them that I was not crazy and that it would work.  (Haven't they seen Sarah's House Season 2?  Psh, clearly not.)  To make matters worse, somewhere in the conversation the second associate said, "Are you sure you want to go with this color?"  Burn.  So, after about 10 minutes of them insulting my color choice and general DIY knowledge and skill, I gave them both my most charming smile and said, "Okay, just mix me a quart of this paint in semi-gloss... please."  (BTW, my husband, the nicer counterpart in our relationship, had his head buried into his hands during most of this.  I later apologized for embarrassing him in the store.  Wouldn't be the first time.)  Usually I'm very chatty with the paint mixers... this time it was quite quiet. Anyway, the point of that long story is that it makes me absolutely crazy when the sales people try to talk me out of things.  Don't they want to make a sale?  I know they probably get a lot of crazies coming into their store, but I always go in with plenty of research under my belt to explain away the crazy... at least to myself.  Luckily, this isn't as common as the sexist power tool dispute.  You know the one, ladies.  It's when you go into a big box store and have a few questions about a power tool and they answer all of them while looking at your husband.  Ugh. Putting this story temporarily on pause (oh yes, there's more), lets move on with the painting.  I ended up purchasing Wishing Well in semi-gloss from Valspar.  I bought the kind that has paint in primer in one for some additional coverage, even though I had already primed.  (Better safe than sorry, right?) I used three coats to get an even finish.  Here's a quick progression between the first coat and the last coat so that you can see how the extra time and coat-age makes a difference:
First coat of paint
After three coats of paint
See the difference? Once the paint was nice and dry we put the feet back on that we had prepped last weekend.  Luckily, this step was super easy since they were just held on by a nut and bolt.  We did purchase new nuts, bolts, and washers for the feet since the old ones were so rusted.  I think it cost us a grand total of $2.13.  In my mind, a totally worthwhile purchase. Here's a closer look so that you can see exactly how the feet are held on. We're very thankful that the tub doesn't way a metric ton even though it's cast iron.  It's still incredibly heavy, but Brad and I were able to flip it onto its right side once the feet were on.  (Maybe it's all that extra weight training I've been doing...) Ta da!  Pretty tub.  Lemme hit you with a quick "before" picture so that you can compare. Pretty big difference, huh? I still have a little bit of work to do on the inside.  There's a bit of caulk and some stains that I need to work out, but that's just a little more cleaning.  Probably another few hours... next weekend. But, it's finally starting to look like a tub that I would actually bathe in.  So exciting! To end our story with the big box paint dudes, Brad and I went back in today to pick up the nuts and bolts for the feet.  And the paint guy was there.  And I called him a hooligan under my breath to my husband.  At around the same time the paint guy said hello to me and asked me how my project was going.  Drat, he remembered me.  I can already see that having someone open the spray paint cabinet for me is going to become much more difficult.  (sigh.) Anyway, I am very pleased with the progress and even more pleased with the fun, youthful color that we picked out for the tub.  Yes, it was risky, but I think it paid off.  It will definitely be the focal point of the bathroom, which I think is a good thing.  Even Brad, who is terrified of color, loves it.  I wish the pictures did it justice... it is SO much more fun in person.  Anyone else taking some serious risks lately?

Installing a New Window

My husband and I work a lot.  It's kind of a necessary evil in our business that if we're not doing 60 hour weeks there's something wrong.  I'm in visual effects "production", which means that I do more artist management, deal with clients, money... that kind of thing.  My husband is an artist, meaning that he actually makes those awesome images on screen, so he's in front of a computer all day (and night) long.  He's also very fortunate in that he's able to do some of his work at home, so it's important to us that he has a nice office that he can be productive in.  (That's his man space - I've got the garage.) The biggest pitfall of Brad's office has been the old, nasty, single-pane window that faces his back when he's on his computer. Not only was it an eyesore, but like just about everything else that we haven't yet replaced in our house, it was very poorly constructed. See that side of the window?  Yeah.  There's no frame all the way around the window.  There was a track on the top and bottom so that it would slide, and then whoever installed it just put a bead of caulk on the side to hold it in.  Genius.  In the summer it gets incredibly warm in that room when the sun is beating into it.  (This window faces south, so we wouldn't get direct sun, but it would kinda hover around it all day.)  So, before summer gets into full swing, we decided it was high time to replace that old, nasty window. One of the reasons I'm posting about this is because Brad and I had never installed a window ourselves before.  Honestly, we were a little intimidated by this project.  (In retrospect, I'm not really sure why.)  Replacing windows was one of the things that we spent WAY too much on when we first moved into our house almost two years ago.  (We paid about $450 per window to have a few of the necessary ones installed.)  We even got one quote to do all the windows in our one story, 1500 sq foot house for $15,000!  Isn't that just insane?  Maybe that's why we were so scared to install them ourselves.  If the labor is that expensive, it must be hard, right? Well, the answer to that question is "no way, Jose!".  Seriously, this was one of the easiest projects we've ever done.  It took us about 2 hours to do on a morning before I had to go to work.  In, out, window replaced.  I'll tell you guys about some of the tricky stuff, but overall, incredibly easy. My pictures of this project are a little bit limited... this is definitely a 2 man job.  So, having one person taking the pictures while the other one does the work was a little tricky.  But, lemme just start by saying that we followed Lowes's instructions on how to install a window from this video, and we had no problems at all.  The video is clear and concise, and there's not a lot of chatter that you have to fast forward through to get to the good stuff. Once we removed the sliding half of the window, the first (and probably the smartest thing that we did in retrospect), was tape the stationary side of the window. Since this piece of glass wasn't being held in by anything other than a bead of caulk, removing it became a mess.  But, it could've been a giant mess of little glass pieces all over everything if we hadn't taped it.
Starting to remove the caulk
The Giant Mess
See how that could've been really bad?  Yeah.  Those Lowes video people are smart cookies.  But, after a little scraping away at the caulk with a box cutter, the old ugly window was gone. So easy, right?  I couldn't believe it either. All that was left of the old window was the top and bottom track.  The video told us to put a little bit of caulk into the corners to make sure there weren't any air leaks.  We found a special caulk at Lowes that was specifically for doors and windows.  (Not sure it makes much of a difference, but being newbies at this kind of thing it made us feel better.) BTW - I totally remember this picture being in focus when I took it.  Oops.  Oh, and the second point of awesomeness regarding this picture:  don't you love my finger poking through my gloves?  I think it's time for some new ones. Anyway, we put just a smidgen of caulk in the corners of the old window track. Once that dried, we did a quick "dry fit" of the window to make sure we didn't screw anything up in the measuring process.  (Tip: take the movable side of the window out before lifting it up.  It makes it so much lighter!)  We were incredibly thankful we did this as there were a few little corners of exterior wood here and there that needed to be chiseled out before the window would fit.  After we guaranteed that the window would actually fit into place, we started the hanging process by setting the window into the opening and preparing to drill the holes. The neat thing about vinyl windows is that there's this little track system at the base that you completely lift up and out of the window.  That way, you can drill your screw holes at the bottom of the window and they're completely hidden once you put the track back in. So, with the track out and the window sitting pretty in the opening, we started to drill the holes for the screws. First, we went through and drilled our holes with a smaller bit all the way through the vinyl, and then we took a larger bit to just the outer layer of vinyl so that the head of the screw would go through the first hole and catch on the inside second hole.  The Lowes video says to use a collar as a stop for the larger bit, but we were extremely careful and found that we didn't need one as the 2 layers of vinyl were separated and we could tell when we had gone through the first layer. Once all of our holes were pre-drilled, we took the window out and put a layer of caulk around the perimeter of the window ledge. Then, we hoisted the window back onto place. In the video, it talks about having to shim the window into place if it wasn't level.  We had shims on hand, but we were very fortunate in that it was level on all sides without any extra shimming. Since we were happy with the positioning, we screwed the window into place.  This step was definitely important to have two people doing the job.  While Brad was screwing it into place, I was holding the window tight against the house.  Once it was attached, we put a quick layer of insulating foam inside all of the crevices to make sure it was sealed tight and replaced the bottom track. Ta-da!  Pretty, new, fully functioning window.  Brad went a little crazy with the insulating foam, so once it dries we need to cut off all of the extra that's coming out around the edges.  We also need to add the trim around the inside edges, but that's as easy as applying a sticker.  You just peel off the backing and stick it on.  But, see what I mean?  Piece of cake.  I have no idea why we were so intimidated by this project.  Now his office is definitely summer proof!  (That's the one great thing about LA, we don't have to "winter proof" anything, but we definitely have to keep the heat out in the summer!) Any projects you guys have taken on lately that were way easier than you thought?  Or, maybe just the opposite, like my ongoing bathtub project...?  

Pedicure Day for the Bathtub

Well, dudes and dudettes... I have some good news and some bad news.  The good news is that my new claw foot tub has been delivered to the house to the tune of $325 (which included delivery).  The bad news is, this sucker is going to take a lot more than a weekend to finish.  I was so wrong about how much it would take to get chubby tubby into shape.  But, in the meantime, here's our progress. We're starting on the bottom of the tub since it obviously requires the most work.  All of the feet were bolted into the bottom, so all we had to do was unscrew them to free them from the bottom of the tub.  (Although it sounds easy, they were pretty rusted in there, so it took some man power.)  We're definitely going to have to replace those bolts when we put the feet back on.  They were so rusted that there was no way to salvage them. I had this brilliant idea to use a paint remover/de greaser to get the first coat of paint of of the feet.  I found this one at Lowes and purchased it since it was water based and low VOC.  Sounds promising, right?

So, I coated the feet with the gel using a paintbrush and let it sit.

While the feet were "soaking", the husband and I got started on the main part of the tub.

The biggest problem was the side that will eventually be facing us when the tub is installed.  (Of course, right?)  The previous owners had caulked it into the wall, so it had a thick layer of white mess all over it.  When they pulled it out of the wall, it even took a baseboard with it that was still attached.

Luckily, once we scored the caulk with a box cutter, we were able to peel off most of it.

Once we peeled off all that we could get, we were left with this:

As you can see, there was still quite a bit of caulk left on the top of it, but it was too thin to peel.  So, I took 80 grit sandpaper and started sanding until my hands went numb.  Then I was left with this:

Vast improvement.  Now, back to the feet.

After they had been sitting in the paint remover for a while, I took a Scotch scrubber pad and went at them.  And, the results weren't that great.  The next tactic was to sand the crap out of them.  That was much more effective.

Once they were sanded down, I dumped them into a bucket of CLR to remove some of the extra rust that was on them.

I bet you guys can guess the next step.

More scrubbing!  This time, cleaning off all of the CLR and the rust.  We went through a rotation with the feet... CLR bucket, scrub, back to the CLR bucket, scrub some more... until we were finally convinced we had gotten all of the muck off of them and the surface was smooth.

Then, it was time for painting.  I used two coats of Rustoleum's Metallic Spray Paint in Satin Nickel, making sure to spray really lightly to not get any dripping.

Here's a close-up so that you can better see the finish and the cute little claws.

So pretty, sparkly, and new (looking).  It amazed me how much detail was in the feet once we were able to get through the mess.  There is one foot that's not in amazing shape... it has a giant hole on one of the "toes", so we'll just put that one in the back corner when we're reassembling the tub.

With the feet done, we moved back to the tub.  We've been rotating through almost the same process that we used on the feet on the outside of the tub.  But, instead of CLR, we're using diluted bleach.  So, we're sanding, then scrubbing down with bleach and steel wool, then sanding again, and then bleaching, and then... you get the point.  We're just trying to get the smoothest possible surface so that we don't have any weird bumps or peeling paint in the future.

Here's where we ended up on Sunday night:

It's getting there... slowly.  BTW, here are the before pictures one more time so that you don't have to scroll all the way back up:

When you look at the "before" and the "in progress", it definitely looks like we've made some headway... right?  I had no idea what a big project this was going to be when we took it on - but I can't wait to see the final product once it's all painted with its pretty new claw toes on.

Side note, this thing is an amazing work out!  I was sweating bullets scrubbing this sucker.

What did you guys do over the Cinco de Mayo weekend?  Anyone else take on a project that turned out to be bigger than imagined?  Anyone lucky spend it drinking Coronas by the pool?  (If so, I am incredibly jealous.)  Either way, hope it was a great one!

Chubby Tubby

Boy, oh boy.  Today is a happy Tuesday, my friends.  I have found my new best friend and bathtub, Chubby Tubby.  (Name is subject to change as we spend more time together.) Some of you may remember a LONG time ago when I promised you all a guest bathroom renovation.  Well, friends, we are one step closer to gutting the disgusting blue palace.  Today, through the power of craigslist, I have acquired my new best friend the claw foot tub.  For any of you who have done bathtub research, you know that a new cast iron claw foot ranges anywhere between $2,000-6,000, so I was so thrilled when I bought this beauty for $300.  Even better, I paid an extra $25 for the guy to deliver it straight to my house and drop it into my garage. Other than a chip or two on the lip, the inside of the tub is pristine.  That's always the thing with antique tubs, you almost always need to have it refinished.  There was no rust to be found anywhere, just an ugly paint job on the outside.  (I learned from watching Sarah's House on HGTV that the thing to look for when buying an old tub is to check if there's any rust or cracking along the drain or near the feet.  Those are the warning signs that your tub may not last very long.) Speaking of Sarah's House, she's a big part of the reason I've always wanted a claw foot tub.
Sarah's House Tub
How fun is that yellow?  Ever since, I've always wanted to restore an old tub and paint the outside to add a punch of color to the bathroom. A few months ago, when West Elm was having their bath sale, I picked up this River Rock Shower Curtain loving how fun and youthful it was: Since then, that aqua has been a big part of the color inspiration for the bathroom.  I had originally wanted a clean, white washed look for the bathroom, but since the shower curtain purchase I've been a bit color happy.  Speaking of color, I also love the light blue that is on the walls in their advertisement photo above and how it offsets the teal in the curtain. Not sure what to paint my new tub, I headed over to Design Seeds to see what kind of color palette would coordinate with what I had already planned.  When I came across "Island Play", I knew I had a winner. Time to break down my thinking. Lets all imagine for a minute that the tub gets painted that darker blue color second from the top on the swatch.  (Don't mind my terrible 5 minute photoshop). And, while I'm usually a huge fan of grellow, lets change that color to a deep brown to represent the dark plank tile that we have in mind for the floors. When you put together the whole picture, you get something like this: That doesn't look too crazy, right?  Maybe I'm just on a bathtub high right now, but that all seems to work pretty cohesively.  BTW, the wall tile pictured above was my cheap-o purchase from Habitat for Humanity that I got when shopping for my shutter for the pinterest challenge.  And, of course, I'm sure a few of you remember Napoleon the vanity that I built to replace the ugly pedestal sink. So, the bottom line is that it's all coming together.  Slowly.  But it's inspiring me more and more every day to start the gut.  We keep pinching our pennies and getting one element at a time.  But, I think the next big purchase will be a contractor to fix the plumbing.  That in itself is exciting since that means we'd be taking that step after demo is complete and the gut has commenced. Anyway, the tub arrives at Casa Strickman on Saturday afternoon... looks like I have my weekend project all planned out!  Do you guys have any weekend projects to tackle now that it's getting warm outside?  Anyone else taking their sweet time on a big project?

Ana White Lap Desk

You know... it's been a crazy few months. All of April I was asking myself "where did March go?". And now I feel like I'm asking myself "where did April go?" as well. I've been working like a crazy person until about a week ago. I've seen my colleagues about 10 times more than my husband, and I've started getting texts and facebook messages from my friends saying, "are you still alive?". Last weekend, I literally slept for 2 straight days... my first real weekend off in about 2 months. It was glorious. This last week I only worked 45 hours. It felt like a vacation. What to do with all of this extra time?! I don't want to make it sound like I'm whining or complaining about work... I absolutely love my job. So much that it's been my entire life since my husband and I got back from our vacation back in February. I've just been... tired. Too tired to build. I woke up on Saturday morning so excited to get into the garage and build something... anything. I've had materials for about 3 projects ready to go, I just need to build them. But, I derailed from my building plans to build this lap desk for my best friend, Brina, for her birthday. (You may remember the side tables I built for her a while back.) She's going to nursing school and also carrying 2 jobs... that girl is superwoman. What I love about this design is all of the extra storage inside of the desk. Room for her to keep her extra papers and highlighters both inside the top and also in the side compartments. I modified Ana's design a little bit to use my Kreg Jig and get tighter joints and have less holes to fill. (It's so cute seeing Ana's plans pre-Jig and see how far she's come!) For example, I assembled the sides as entire pieces and then attached them to the center box rather than screwing all of the pieces into the center individually. The best part about this desk? It cost me $0. That's right. Awesome birthday present that she loved for $0. I had the extra set of hinges from another project and used all wood scraps. I also have a collection of spray paint colors that I bought because I really like them, not necessarily because I have a project in mind for them. (The paint color is "hot pink" spray paint by Valspar that I purchased at Lowes. It has 2 coats of paint with a layer of Killz Odorless Spray Primer underneath.) While I felt a little rusty having not built anything for about 2 months, I started building at about 10AM and left my house with the desk in hand at about 5:15. Not too shabby to build and finish the entire piece, huh? For the full project plan, here is the link on Ana's site.

Madison Bedside Table

Well, guys... it's been a while.  And, I'm sorry.  Work has been the most out of control that it's been for me in years.  Lots of late nights, midnight conference calls, and harsh deadlines have been going on at my office to get the latest movie we've been working on out the door.  We have one more big project we're working on right now that's wrapping up, but after that's over I'm really hoping we get a break so that I can do more of what I love... building.  Now that it's spring time I have so many outdoor projects I want to do.  I just need more time to do them!

I want to thank all of you who've stuck with me.  I really do have the most kind and loyal readers that anyone could ask for.  I apologize for not answering your comments, responding to emails, doing all of the things that I'm usually so on top of.  Your patience is appreciated, and I promise I don't take it for granted.

Since I've been so MIA, I wanted the first thing I came back with to be something that was "reader requested".  Special thanks to Jessica for emailing me about expanding the Madison Collection!  Based on the Chelsea Bedside Table by PB Teen, this side table goes great with the Madison Dresser and Platform Bed with Cubby.

Continue reading "Madison Bedside Table"

And again. That thing is beautiful. Test comments

Mauris vel neque sit amet nunc gravida congue sed sit amet purus. Quisque lacus quam, egestas ac tincidunt a, lacinia vel velit. Aenean facilisis nulla vitae urna tincidunt congue sed ut dui. Morbi malesuada nulla nec purus convallis consequat. Vivamus id mollis quam. Morbi ac commodo nulla. In condimentum orci id nisl volutpat bibendum. Quisque commodo hendrerit lorem quis egestas. Maecenas quis tortor arcu. Vivamus rutrum nunc non neque consectetur quis placerat neque lobortis. Nam vestibulum, arcu sodales feugiat consectetur, nisl orci bibendum elit, eu euismod magna sapien ut nibh. Donec semper quam scelerisque tortor dictum gravida. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nam pulvinar, odio sed rhoncus suscipit, sem diam ultrices mauris, eu consequat purus metus eu velit. Proin metus odio, aliquam eget molestie nec, gravida ut sapien. Phasellus quis est sed turpis sollicitudin venenatis sed eu odio. Praesent eget neque eu eros interdum malesuada non vel leo. Sed fringilla porta ligula egestas tincidunt. Nullam risus magna, ornare vitae varius eget, scelerisque a libero. Morbi eu porttitor ipsum. Nullam lorem nisi, posuere quis volutpat eget, luctus nec massa. Pellentesque aliquam lacinia tellus sit amet bibendum. Ut posuere justo in enim pretium scelerisque. Etiam ornare vehicula euismod. Mauris vel neque sit amet nunc gravida congue sed sit amet purus. Quisque lacus quam, egestas ac tincidunt a, lacinia vel velit. Aenean facilisis nulla vitae urna tincidunt congue sed ut dui. Morbi malesuada nulla nec purus convallis consequat. Vivamus id mollis quam. Morbi ac commodo nulla. In condimentum orci id nisl volutpat bibendum. Quisque commodo hendrerit lorem quis egestas. Maecenas quis tortor arcu. Vivamus rutrum nunc non neque consectetur quis placerat neque lobortis. Nam vestibulum, arcu sodales feugiat consectetur, nisl orci bibendum elit, eu euismod magna sapien ut nibh. Donec semper quam scelerisque tortor dictum gravida. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nam pulvinar, odio sed rhoncus suscipit, sem diam ultrices mauris, eu consequat purus metus eu velit. Proin metus odio, aliquam eget molestie nec, gravida ut sapien. Phasellus quis est sed turpis sollicitudin venenatis sed eu odio. Praesent eget neque eu eros interdum malesuada non vel leo. Sed fringilla porta ligula egestas tincidunt. Nullam risus magna, ornare vitae varius eget, scelerisque a libero. Morbi eu porttitor ipsum. Nullam lorem nisi, posuere quis volutpat eget, luctus nec massa. Pellentesque aliquam lacinia tellus sit amet bibendum. Ut posuere justo in enim pretium scelerisque. Etiam ornare vehicula euismod.

Brand new project

Mauris vel neque sit amet nunc gravida congue sed sit amet purus. Quisque lacus quam, egestas ac tincidunt a, lacinia vel velit. Aenean facilisis nulla vitae urna tincidunt congue sed ut dui. Morbi malesuada nulla nec purus convallis consequat. Vivamus id mollis quam. Morbi ac commodo nulla. In condimentum orci id nisl volutpat bibendum. Quisque commodo hendrerit lorem quis egestas. Maecenas quis tortor arcu. Vivamus rutrum nunc non neque consectetur quis placerat neque lobortis. Nam vestibulum, arcu sodales feugiat consectetur, nisl orci bibendum elit, eu euismod magna sapien ut nibh. Donec semper quam scelerisque tortor dictum gravida. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nam pulvinar, odio sed rhoncus suscipit, sem diam ultrices mauris, eu consequat purus metus eu velit. Proin metus odio, aliquam eget molestie nec, gravida ut sapien. Phasellus quis est sed turpis sollicitudin venenatis sed eu odio. Praesent eget neque eu eros interdum malesuada non vel leo. Sed fringilla porta ligula egestas tincidunt. Nullam risus magna, ornare vitae varius eget, scelerisque a libero. Morbi eu porttitor ipsum. Nullam lorem nisi, posuere quis volutpat eget, luctus nec massa. Pellentesque aliquam lacinia tellus sit amet bibendum. Ut posuere justo in enim pretium scelerisque. Etiam ornare vehicula euismod.

Typography

Mauris vel neque sit amet nunc gravida congue sed sit amet purus. Quisque lacus quam, egestas ac tincidunt a, lacinia vel velit. Aenean facilisis nulla vitae urna tincidunt congue sed ut dui. Morbi malesuada nulla nec purus convallis consequat. Vivamus id mollis quam. Morbi ac commodo nulla. In condimentum orci id nisl volutpat bibendum. Quisque commodo hendrerit lorem quis egestas. Maecenas quis tortor arcu. Vivamus rutrum nunc non neque consectetur quis placerat neque lobortis. Nam vestibulum, arcu sodales feugiat consectetur, nisl orci bibendum elit, eu euismod magna sapien ut nibh. Donec semper quam scelerisque tortor dictum gravida. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nam pulvinar, odio sed rhoncus suscipit, sem diam ultrices mauris, eu consequat purus metus eu velit. Proin metus odio, aliquam eget molestie nec, gravida ut sapien. Phasellus quis est sed turpis sollicitudin venenatis sed eu odio. Praesent eget neque eu eros interdum malesuada non vel leo. Sed fringilla porta ligula egestas tincidunt. Nullam risus magna, ornare vitae varius eget, scelerisque a libero. Morbi eu porttitor ipsum. Nullam lorem nisi, posuere quis volutpat eget, luctus nec massa. Pellentesque aliquam lacinia tellus sit amet bibendum. Ut posuere justo in enim pretium scelerisque. Etiam ornare vehicula euismod. Mauris vel neque sit amet nunc gravida congue sed sit amet purus. Quisque lacus quam, egestas ac tincidunt a, lacinia vel velit. Aenean facilisis nulla vitae urna tincidunt congue sed ut dui. Morbi malesuada nulla nec purus convallis consequat. Vivamus id mollis quam. Morbi ac commodo nulla. In condimentum orci id nisl volutpat bibendum. Quisque commodo hendrerit lorem quis egestas. Maecenas quis tortor arcu. Vivamus rutrum nunc non neque consectetur quis placerat neque lobortis. Nam vestibulum, arcu sodales feugiat consectetur, nisl orci bibendum elit, eu euismod magna sapien ut nibh. Donec semper quam scelerisque tortor dictum gravida. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Nam pulvinar, odio sed rhoncus suscipit, sem diam ultrices mauris, eu consequat purus metus eu velit. Proin metus odio, aliquam eget molestie nec, gravida ut sapien. Phasellus quis est sed turpis sollicitudin venenatis sed eu odio. Praesent eget neque eu eros interdum malesuada non vel leo. Sed fringilla porta ligula egestas tincidunt. Nullam risus magna, ornare vitae varius eget, scelerisque a libero. Morbi eu porttitor ipsum. Nullam lorem nisi, posuere quis volutpat eget, luctus nec massa. Pellentesque aliquam lacinia tellus sit amet bibendum. Ut posuere justo in enim pretium scelerisque. Etiam ornare vehicula euismod.